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INNOVATIVE KITCHEN GADGETS: FROM CONCEPT TO REALITY

THE DEMAND FOR NEW KITCHEN INVENTIONS

Despite the continually growing number of consumption options related to food, from delivery services to drive-thru eating and more, a recent academic study found that “half of all Americans cook dinner 6 or 7 nights a week”. That statistic is encouraging given that groups ranging from medical professionals to mothers to politicians generally agree that cooking at home is a key to better eating habits. However, convenience and accessibility are still key factors in determining whether or not families choose to cook at home according to the study. Here are a few great inventions in U.S. history that made cooking a little easier:

The Dishwasher: In 1893, Josephine Cochran unveiled her plans for a dishwasher Chicago World’s Fair. With servants who continually cracked her fine China, Josephine wanted a machine that could wash her dishes.

The Electric Stove: In 1912, Lloyd Groff Copeman and his Copeman Electric Stove Company of Flint, Michigan was granted the 1st patent for electric stove. Copeman is also credited with inventing the flexible rubber ice cube tray

Tupperware: In 1946, American chemist Earl Silas Tupper essentially invented “leftovers” when he devised a process of purifying black polyethylene slag (a waste product), into the transparent, flexible, non-porous substance that we today know as tupperware.

What innovative invention ideas are America’s brightest minds cooking up that will change the way we spend time in the kitchen in the near future?

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NEW KITCHEN PRODUCTS SUPPORTED BY INNOVATE

Multi Purpose Drying Caddy

One day while finishing the dishes in her kitchen and searching in vain for a place to store and dry her rubber gloves, Christine Daws came up with the concept of her multi-purpose drying caddy.Christine engaged with Innovate Product Design to patent and prototype her idea. Beginning in the Autumn of 2012, Innovate began working with Christine to create display boards, CAD drawings and other materials to assist the patent process. In early 2013, Christine was passed on to IPconsult to finalize her patent application and design registration.

Today her product is sold by the British retailer KitchenCraft, where customers have posted rave reviews about the innovative kitchen product.

SinkStation Colander

Even after the most delicious of meals, nobody enjoys reaching into the depths of a clogged sink to fish out chunks of vegetable peelings and food waste. Faced with this unenviable task one evening, Damon Meredith decided there had to be a better way of preventing waste from clogging up the her kitchen sink. Innovate Product Design assisted Damon in bringing his innovative kitchen gadget idea to reality by:
Conducting a market analysis to assess demand
Recommending the most suitable form of intellectual property protection
Creating photorealistic CAD visualizations using design software
Advising on routes to market for his kitchen invention
Supporting on-going development of the product once launched
Today the SinkStation is sold globally through a distributor and has won numerous awards for its simple ingenuity.

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The material in this website is commercially focused and generalized information and opinion about successfully working within the existing legal framework of Intellectual Property, patents and patent law; and should in no way be viewed or construed as legal advice. Advisors at Innovate are not and will not be lawyers unless this is specifically stated.